Thursday, February 26, 2015

Turquerie: An Eighteenth Century European Fantasy

This stunning book by Haydn Williams for the first time gives a historic perspective on the eighteenth century European fascination with Turkish culture in fine art, the decorative arts, and architecture.

Travelers and traders  brought home vivid accounts of the Ottoman Empire, the style, the culture, the exotic! For the first time, translations of books such as One Thousand and One Nights brought to light the imagery of this luxurious magnificence. Turquerie is a theme where we see turbaned figures, elegantly draped and languishing royalty. Art and wall panels often featured palm trees, camels, crescent moons, horsetail standards, elaborate follies and tents. Portraits painted in this relaxed manner was new to Europeans, where subjects stood upright to be painted. The zenith of excitement was realized in France; though Turquerie reached far and wide with the construction of a Mosque Folly at Kew gardens in London and Turkish tents constructed in Dresden along the Elbe to celebrate a Royal Wedding.

 
One of a pair of  pietre dure plaques of  Turqs, Galleria dei Lavori,  Florence c 1770 colored hard-stones, gilded bronze frame, French c 1780






Turquerie: An Eighteenth Century European Fantasy

by Haydn Williams

Published by Thames & Hudson (November 2014)


Charlotte Grenville, Lady Williams-Wynn, with her three Eldest Children by Joshua Reynolds, c 1778 oil on canvas. Image Credit: Cardiff, National Museum of Wales/ Photo The Bridgeman Art Library



 
Charles Gravier, Comte de Vergennes by Antoine de Favray, 1766 oil on canvas.  Image Credit: Istanbul: Suna Inan Kirac Foundation Collection


 
Front elevation ( detail) of the Mosque at Kew from William Chambers. Surrey, London 1763, Plate 26, engraved by Edward Rooker. Image Credit: Riba Library Books and Periodicals Collection


 
Salon Turq of Queen Maria Carolina of Naples and Sicily at The Villa Favorita, Palermo early 19th Century. Photo Credit: Dario di Vincenzo

The Hunt Picnic, one of a set of four decorative panels from the chateau de Ognon-en-Valois by Christophe Huet c 1750, oil on canvas Image Credit: Birmingham Museum of Art, Purchase with funds provided by The Art Fund, Inc and the 1992 Museum and Ball, Photo credit: Sean Pathasema
 

Figure of a Turq on an Elephant, Meissan Manufactory, Model by Johann Joachim Kandler and Peter Reinicke C 1745 hard paste porcelain, contemporary French gilded bronze mounts. Image Credit: Munich: Robbig

 
The Mastiff's Seraglio, by Jean-Baptiste Oudry, 1734, oil on canvas. Image credit: Audap and Mirabaud
 
 

      Charles Gravier, comte de Vergennes, by Antoine de Favray, 1766, oil on canvas. Image Courtesy of Thames and Hudson         



 Thank you to Harry Burton of Thames and Hudson for the review copy of Turquerie

Turquerie: An Eighteenth Century European Fantasy may be purchased at your local book seller or at Amazon.com 

Much thanks to my Friends, Family, and Followers who support The Arts

xoxo
Karena
The Arts by Karena


Please sign up for notification of my latest features via email right here on my site! 
Do leave a comment as they make my day!
 



 


























18 comments:

Mary Ann Pickett said...

What a beautiful post! I learn so much from you!

Mariette VandenMunckhof-Vedder said...

Dearest Karena,
Love especially the painting of The Mastiff's Seraglio! Incredible art of that era. Wish we would see more of that at present.
Hugs,
Mariette

Teresa Hatfield ~ Splendid Sass said...

Oh my goodness. Stunning art here, Karen! I am especially in love with The Mastiff's Seraglio!
Thank you for sharing this beauty with us!
Teresa
xoxo

Elizabeth@ Pine Cones and Acorns said...

This looks like a fabulous book! The art is stunning.

I hope that you are having a wonderful week.

Karen said...

What a beautiful book. It would be one worth having. You always have such interesting and educational posts, thank you for enlightening all of us.
Karen

Celia M. High Heeled Life said...

Dearest Karena - thank you for sharing such breath taking beauty. The colours are so soothing. I always leave your corner of BlogLand a little richer in knowledge. Blessings Celia M. (HHL)

Kristen @ Pursuing Vintage said...

So beautiful and such detail! "The Mastiff's Seraglio" has to be my favorite!

La Contessa said...

THE PILLOWS!!!!!!!!The velvet the trim..............

Leslie said...

What a gorgeous book Karena! Spectacular beauty and incredible detail. Thank you for sharing! Enjoy the weekend ahead:) xxleslie

Paisley Curtain said...

This is a stunningly beautiful book, Turquerie and Mughal art both is fascinating and different..
Best wishes

MJH DesignArts said...

Hi Karena, This is an amazing book--need it to add to my collection of Chinoiserie books. Super review, too. xoxoxo Mary

The enchanted home said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
The enchanted home said...

Breathtaking!! The book looks like a must have for any art lover. I particularly love The Mastiff's Seraglio, so charming and the colors are gorgeous!
Have a great Sunday.

Abst1986 said...

Amazing post! Thanks for sharing. Just as you said, the book is worth reading. All the pictures are breathtakingly beautiful.

designchic said...

This looks like an amazing book with incredible images…Happy Monday!!

Mary Jo Matsumoto said...

Hi Karena, I love the kind of effort and care that goes into books like these. Love that dog painting too! Hoping all is well with you.

xo Mary Jo

Castles Crowns and Cottages said...

GOod morning, Karena!

Lovely books and an exquisite world of art that I never really explored. You certainly know your art and d├ęcor! Many thanks for coming by to visit! I am enjoying my private writing, missing posting, but trying to visit blogs when I can. How could I stay away from all this beauty!

I hope you are well? Again, many thanks for your kindness! HUGS TO YOU! Anita

LBDDiaries said...

Beautiful pictures. Looks like another book I need to look into. I do have to wonder if the The Mastiff's Seraglio picture isn't akin to the dogs playing poker one? Tongue in cheek?

Blog Archive